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Think Perl 6 mega book review

This title comes amid a shower of announcements of forthcoming Perl 6 books, therefore I initially thought  that so many releases at the same time could potentially disorient the aspiring reader. Fortunately it looks more like that each title addresses different kinds of audiences and at I Programmer we aims to find more about what's in it for each audience. 
Think Perl 6 is targeting the uninitiated in programming in general, as such it goes over the pure basics and the raw elements that make up programming as a science.

That said, I don't have the answer as to why someone would be compelled to kick off his exploration of Computer Science with Perl 6 as his first language when there are so many, popular and well tried alternatives such as Python, JavaScript or Java. That person would be someone already versed in some computing, more like a teacher or mentor who finds the idea of tackling Perl 6 rather exciting, and rightly so, as 6 is a post-modern programming language that adopts the latest, state of the art advancements in the world of programming language design.

Another candidate that I can imagine, would be a scientist in a field like Physics or Data Science looking for a tool to make his job easier, or, a high school graduate looking to bootstrap his journey to the world of programming, more likely being recommended Perl 6 by someone more knowledgeable than make that choice by himself.

And, certainly 6 ought to be particularly attractive to Perl 5 hackers eager to see through the hype and discover what Perl's version 6 has in stock for them despite the fact that apart from some similarities  in symbols and syntax, everything else differs. As Larry Wall once said Perl 6 would be:

"Perl 5 done right".

What's been carried over unaltered though is Perl 5's philosophy and innovative thinking.

full review on i-programmer

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