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Hardcore DevOps:Building A Portable Weblogic Client on the CLI

It shouldn't be that difficult to build a standalone Weblogic WS-Security enabled client for invoking JAX Web Services, but the reality is that it is. Let's find out why.

What is recurring in the above passages is 'classpath' and the need for the Weblogic Server libraries to be available to it.Thing is I don't want to go through setting up a WebLogic instance just to get  to those libraries, or build a client that depends on the classpath as well as the machine's or host OS's intricacies.Furthermore, any setup would have to be multiplied by 10, the number of machines looking to access the same web service.
In any case my Java client should always call into a Weblogic, well, 'client' library in order to consume the necessary functionality.Turns out that choosing the appropriate one is convoluted:

Do I need wlfullclient.jar, wlthint3client.jar, wlclient.jar, wljmsclient.jar, wlclient.jar, or maybe wlsafclient.jar? Also, don't forget wl…
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Book Review : How To Create Pragmatic, Lightweight Languages

At last, a guide that makes creating a language with its associated baggage of lexers, parsers and compilers, accessible to mere mortals, rather to a group of a few hardcore eclectics as it stood until now.

The first thing that catches the eye, is the subtitle:

The unix philosophy applied to language design, for GPLs and DSLs"
What is meant by "unix philosophy" ?. It's taking simple, high quality components and combining them together in smart ways to obtain a complex result; the exact approach the book adopts.
I'm getting ahead here, but a first sample of this philosophy becomes apparent at the beginnings of Chapter 5 where the Parser treats and calls the Lexer like  unix's pipes as in lexer|parser. Until the end of the book, this pipeline is going to become larger, like a chain, due to the amount of components that end up interacting together.

The book opens by putting things into perspective in Chapter 1: Motivation: why do you want to build lan…

Think Perl 6 mega book review

This title comes amid a shower of announcements of forthcoming Perl 6 books, therefore I initially thought  that so many releases at the same time could potentially disorient the aspiring reader. Fortunately it looks more like that each title addresses different kinds of audiences and at I Programmer we aims to find more about what's in it for each audience.
Think Perl 6 is targeting the uninitiated in programming in general, as such it goes over the pure basics and the raw elements that make up programming as a science.

That said, I don't have the answer as to why someone would be compelled to kick off his exploration of Computer Science with Perl 6 as his first language when there are so many, popular and well tried alternatives such as Python, JavaScript or Java. That person would be someone already versed in some computing, more like a teacher or mentor who finds the idea of tackling Perl 6 rather exciting, and rightly so, as 6 is a post-modern programming lan…

Insider's Guide To Udacity Android Developer Nanodegree Part 3 - Making the Baking App

Continuing to chart my experience of Udacity's Android Developer Nanodegree we step up in level, embarking on the advanced part of the super-course.
Completing project "Popular Movies" (see Part 2 of this series) signaled the end of "Android Developer". Now we are ready to tackle the second element of the program "Advanced Android Developer", a new class with a new syllabus and project. Continuing to chart my experience of Udacity's Android Developer Nanodegree we step up in level, embarking on the advanced part of the super-course.

Completing project "Popular Movies" (see Part 2 of this series) signaled the end of "Android Developer". Now we are ready to tackle the second element of the program "Advanced Android Developer", a new class with a new syllabus and project.

"Advanced Android Developer" is a mixed bag of self contained material and of coding seven different sample apps to learn about the…

Grimoire Lab-GitHub - Stats On Steroids

Grimoire Lab is an open source toolkit built on Python, Elasticsearch and Kibana. It taps into GitHub's raw data through Perceval, a module designed for retrieving data from repositories related to software development.

Perceval forwards the data to another tool for filtering, the so called Sorting Hat, responsible for managing and merging identities that correspond to the same real person/commiter and potentially come from different sources, before finally rendering the data manageable and accessible through rich UI Kibiter dashboards. Kibiter, a fork of Kibana, is what enables the user to create and edit visualizations as well as perform queries facilitated by the underlying Elasticsearch REST APIs.

full article on i-programmer.info

JSON Feed - The New RSS?

SON Feed is a new take on the web syndication format, but unlike RSS and Atom it's in JSON, not XML. So what does it try to do better?

Mainly overcome the perils of XML; it's complex, heavyweight, difficult to parse and not in sync with the current trend wanting web data exchange happening almost exclusively in JSON document representation.

In contrast, JSON is easier to both write and parse, manipulate and consume, especially given that its data types are exact reflections of their native Javascript counterparts.
Devised by Brent Simmons, the original developer of the popular NetNewsWire and Manton Reece creator of Micro Blogs, both with a great background on publishing with RSS, it's a certainty that JSON Feed will emerge as a strong competitor to both Atom and RSS, being based upon their decade long experience on decentralized formats.

On top of that it also tries to tackle a few other issues plaguing RSS, mainly the lack of realtime client notification whe…

Graphcool Eases Your Way Into GraphQL

GraphQL, dubbed by many as REST's successor, is a query language in which you can query database driven, JSON schema-exposed APIs. The problem is that because it is so different from REST, getting the hang of GraphQL when starting out is not that easy.
But why go the trouble now that there are cloud-based FaaS (Framework as a Service) services such as Graphcool which take the pain out of the process of setting up, configuring, running and testing your GraphQL backend?
Graphcool is a newly established GraphQL backend for mobile and web developers that lives on the AWS cloud:
Data is persisted in a high-availability cluster of AWS Aurora databases combined with a Redis-powered caching layer.
Files are securely stored in Amazon S3 and can be accessed through a fast CDN.
Business Logic is implemented as serverless functions and deployed to AWS Lambda.
Website Hosting uses Netlify's CDN. and lowers the entry barrier in getting into GraphQL.

With Graphcool you don't have…