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Insider's Guide To Udacity Android Developer Nanodegree Part 3 - Making the Baking App


Continuing to chart my experience of Udacity's Android Developer Nanodegree we step up in level, embarking on the advanced part of the super-course.
Completing project "Popular Movies" (see Part 2 of this series) signaled the end of "Android Developer". Now we are ready to tackle the second element of the program "Advanced Android Developer", a new class with a new syllabus and project.
Continuing to chart my experience of Udacity's Android Developer Nanodegree we step up in level, embarking on the advanced part of the super-course.

Completing project "Popular Movies" (see Part 2 of this series) signaled the end of "Android Developer". Now we are ready to tackle the second element of the program "Advanced Android Developer", a new class with a new syllabus and project.

"Advanced Android Developer" is a mixed bag of self contained material and of coding seven different sample apps to learn about the advanced capabilities of the Android platform. These lessons with their associated sample applications are:

    Learn to use Fragments, reusable UI components which resemble "mini activities" in coding the AndroidMe app, an application that lets you style your own Android(avatar) by customizing it's hair and clothing.

    Learn to use Libraries, a set of third party classes and methods that can be reused in all kinds of projects, in coding the Emojify app, a fun application that turns your face in a selfie into an appropriate Emoji based on your facial expression.

    Learn to use Notifications and background services based on FCM, the Fire Cloud Messaging platform in coding Squawker, a social media app where the course instructors send "Squawks" whenever the mood strikes.The application then shows new server data in real time and in a battery efficient way.

    In Places, you learn how Android locates devices in the globe using GPS and other techniques.By implementing Geofences in coding the ShushMe app, you learn to trigger actions based on locations that turn your device silent whenever you enter any of a list of places of your choice.

    The chapter on Media Playback shows how to add multimedia, background playbacks, external clients and media sessions by including the ExoPlayer media library in coding ClassicalMusicQuiz, a simple audio-based quiz app where you try to guess the composer by listening to a musical piece.

    In Widgets you learn how to display updated information from your app in an associated widget placed on your device's home screen, in coding MyGarden, a plant growing app where you add plants to your garden and keep them alive by regularly watering them.

    In coding TeaTime, a mock tea ordering app, you learn how to test your UI  (Views, AdapterViews, Intents, IdlingResources) using the Espresso Testing framework.

    Publish Your App walks you through all the steps required in order to release your app into the world, engage with your audience and earn revenue.

Finally we'll use all that we've learned to showcase the skills gained, in building the course's final project.Unlike "Popular Movies" where we were given an implementation guide to follow, this time it's up to us to figure things out.

full mega review on i-programmer.info

Continuing to chart my experience of Udacity's Android Developer Nanodegree we step up in level, embarking on the advanced part of the super-course.
Completing project "Popular Movies" (see Part 2 of this series) signaled the end of "Android Developer". Now we are ready to tackle the second element of the program "Advanced Android Developer", a new class with a new syllabus and project.

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