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Associate Android Developer Certification by Google

To meet the job market's ever growing demand for  certified Android developers, Google once more in partnership with Udacity, has started offering an "Associate Android Developer Certification",  obtainable through just a single exam.

It's a move that might seem in contradiction to the certifications already offered by Udacity through its Android Developer Nanodegrees, again co-created by Google, but in contrast to a Nanodegree, getting hold of this certification doesn't require attending a lengthy or expensive course, in which you do projects and stick to class deadlines.
The candidate has to only take a one-off exam for a fee of $149. It requires the downloading of a few Android Studio project files and working on them for a period of  48 hours of work before  handing them over for their grading.

full article on i-programmer

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