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AWS Lambda For The Impatient Part

The problem with entering the AWS world for the first time is that it's like entering a labyrinth, a futile attempt of navigating through an endless maze of documentation, policies, endpoints, services, tokens and authentications. The task of having to hook all that up in order to get on with your job is daunting. Here is the help you need for AWS Lambda.

Tthe range of AWS offerings is just immense with so many services and providers to choose from, like EC2, S3, Athena, Kinesis, Lambdas, CloudFront, DynamoDB, API Gateway, and the list goes on.

In this tutorial, however, we're going to take a deep look into the Lambdas and the serverless architecture they support.The beauty of serverless computing isn't that you don't need a server, but you don't need to manage one.Your function lives in its own space on the cloud, capable of being called through multiple entry points, while despite self-contained, still capable of calling other functions or APIs , triggering something akin to a chain reaction:

You can use AWS Lambda to run your code in response to events, such as changes to data in an Amazon S3 bucket or an Amazon DynamoDB table; to run your code in response to HTTP requests using Amazon API Gateway; or invoke your code using API calls made using AWS SDKs. With these capabilities, you can use Lambda to easily build data processing triggers for AWS services like Amazon S3 and Amazon DynamoDB process streaming data stored in Amazon Kinesis, or create your own back end that operates at AWS scale, performance, and security

This of course can't be done in isolation since we also need the help of other APIs and services in order to utilize Lambdas, hence in this tutorial we'll also take a look into calling our Lambda functions through API Gateways and HTTP endpoints by using tools such as Postman, Powershell, AWS CLI and finally Perl's Paws module. We're also going to  fire authenticated requests tied to IAM Roles and managed policies, understand what's going on behind the scenes by going through the CloudWatch logs, as well as write our server and client code, the first one in Nodejs while the latter in Perl.  

full article on i-programmer.info

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